5 Factors To Consider When Packaging Your Product

Research studies have shown that many business owners pay a lot of attention on the product, but fail to think how to pack their products. To be successful in business you should pay a lot of attention on how you pack your products.

There are many types of packaging that you can use. The most common ones are: bottles, fin packets, stick packets, blister packs, multi packs, and pillow packets. To help you out here are some of the factors that you should consider when packaging your product.

Brand Centric

Does the packaging of your product represent your product? It should. For example, if you are selling sugar, you should ensure that your customers know this from just looking at the packet. This calls for you to put a photo of sugar on the pack. It’s also wise that you put the name “Sugar” on the packet.

Target Market

Experts say that you shouldn’t try to be appealing to everyone as you risk appealing to no one. As rule of thumb you should ensure that your packaging “talks” to your customers. For example, if your target customers are youths, you should ensure that you pack the product in a unique and exciting way so that your customers can associate with it.

Color

The color that you go with greatly determines how people will respond to the product. You should consider a number of factors when deciding on the best color to go with. Some of the factors that you should consider include: your target audience, trends and brand identity.

Size

The size that you go with greatly determines how people will respond to your product. To be on the safe side you should use as many standard sizes as possible. Doing this will not only make your product appealing to many people, it will also greatly reduce your production costs. It will also give you more flexibility when transporting the product.

Distribution

You should consider how your product will be distributed. If it will be transported to a long distance, you should ensure it’s well protected from damage. Many people feel that protective packaging is there to add cost, but this isn’t the case. Always remember that it will always cost you more to replace the product than to replace the packaging material; therefore, always undertake protective packaging.

Conclusion

These are the factors that you should consider when packaging your product. For ideal results always ensure that the packaging is designed and manufactured by a professional company.

How to Communicate and Negotiate in Life to Better Effect

We all use negotiation constantly in our communications. Starting as children we quickly learn that if we promise to be good we gain some advantage or positive result. That understanding is often quickly transferred to our other relationships, where we learn the value of trading. We give something the other person wants in return for some benefit to ourselves.

Children quickly learn to be quiet in return for sweets. That is the fundamental tenet behind every negotiation, a win/win situation for all concerned. The fact that the child may manipulate the situation when they want more sweets may have to dealt with by using penalty clauses and riders as time goes on. The negotiator too has to learn how to trade.

As an adult the art of skillful negotiation is in learning to trade something that we are not too concerned about losing. The skill is in treating it as if it is really important, as if it really matters to us. We create in the other person a sense that are we are making a huge contribution to the negotiation process by allowing a particular concession to be made.

When the other person feels that they are gaining an advantage they are more likely to relax their guard and become more flexible. When they feel that they are gaining ground they will often decide that it is reasonable to make some concessions to the negotiations. They are more likely to feel the need to reciprocate, as a gesture of good faith on their part.

A good negotiator treats the other person with respect. Good manners are a large part of being good at the job. A person who is calm, poised and polite will appear to be in control, measured and clear as to what they are doing. They will instill in the other person a sense of confidence.

Meeting someone halfway is a good negotiation technique. In daily life, we will all have had times when we have been in a group or with a friend and have had to decide where to go for a social evening. Negotiation can be required in these situations. We may decide to take it in turns as to where to go, or decide to go somewhere completely different as an alternative option. The skill is in being respectful and flexible, is in appreciating that each point of view has its own validity and importance.

In acrimonious couples counselling I sometimes say to my clients ‘you may win the argument, but lose the relationship’. Being pedantic and inflexible may ensure that you get what you want as an outcome in the short term, but in the longer term it may be a massive price to pay. Appreciating that each person has reasons for their opinions, feels justified in holding the view that they have, can bring some sense of perspective to the counselling process.

Effective communications are about trying to clearly understand what each person is saying, what they are hoping to achieve and how the different sides of the discussion can find resolution and compromise. Negotiation is a valuable process to apply. By trading, giving ground and feeling to gain some positive results or compromise each side can feel that they are successfully making headway and achieving a better relationship into the bargain.

Creating 3D Presentations

In a typical architectural office, the method of modeling you choose often depends on the comfort level of those performing the work. You should, however, familiarize yourself with all three methods to have a variety of tools options.

There is no right or wrong way of creating 3D presentations and the last thing you want to do is to rely on only one method of modeling scenes. In the real world, you will use a combination of methods.

Think of it as buying a large set of mechanics tools. You get several cabinets (software packages), each with several drawers (menus and panels). Each drawer is filled with unusual tools (commands and modifiers). Until you familiarize yourself with as many tools as possible and have a feel for where they are and when best to use them, there is no way you can fix a car in a productive and cost-effective manner.

Even though you have the tools to model incredible detail, however, keep in mind that not all detail has to be modeled. Most 3D programs have the tools to create the illusion of 3D geometry when none exists and a productive office must know when it is appropriate to simulate complex geometry instead of modeling it.

Some 3D tools for simulating geometry are:

Bump Mapping

Opacity Mapping

Environmental Backgrounds

A couple of helpful books for anyone creating buildings and everyday household objects are the student or professional versions of Architectural Graphics Standards by Ramsey/Sleeper (John Wiley and Sons) and The Architect’s Portable Handbook by Pat Guthrie. For years the professional version of Architectural Graphics Standards has been the bible for architects and builders as a reference for the determining sizes of almost everything you can imagine from restaurant equipment, to sports field layout, to standard construction methods.