Web Site Can Be Made More Presentable

Your website works as your spokesperson presenting the message you wish to convey. Thinking in terms of this analogy often helps you to look at your website from a different angle and make visitor-friendly changes.

Imagine a situation – you have to make an announcement about an exciting event or an opportunity. You have appointed a spokesperson to make a presentation on your behalf to an audience consisting of invitees, interested persons and on-lookers. How would you like her to perform? Your website should do the job of a real, living spokesperson. Following considerations will make your website more presentable.

1) Main Theme – The presentation in the above example has been organized for a particular occasion. Similarly each webpage should be built around a particular theme. It doesn’t help if too much information is given on a webpage on seemingly unrelated issues.

2) Fast Opening – You would certainly not like your spokesperson to be late and make your audience impatient. When a visitor clicks URL of your webpage or is redirected there, the webpage should open real fast. Your webpage gets just a few seconds to engage your visitor’s attention. You would like your visitors to spend those few seconds looking at your webpage rather than waiting for the webpage to open.

3) Appearance – The spokesperson should have pleasant appearance and should wear a welcoming smile. This is to ensure that the audience is not put off even before start of the presentation. Your webpage should have a pleasant, inviting appearance to attract your visitor. If spokesperson is very gorgeous looking, she will distract attention of the audience from the real issue. Your website should avoid loud graphics and distracting colors so that the visitor remains focused on the main theme.

4) Make Text Interesting – You would like your spokesperson to use clear, flowing language, keep the audience interested and gradually lead them to the main theme. The presentation should be interactive, made lively by stories, snippets etc. Monotonous speech should be avoided. All these ideas can be incorporated while designing the website. The text should be broken into small paragraphs of 4-5 sentences or less, subtitles should be added for clarity, key words should be made bold. These are some ideas to make text more readable. Often a visitor will see only titles and subtitles. Therefore on their own the title and subtitles should convey the basic message.

5) Highlight Benefits – Other methods can be used to make the audience interested. The audience is really interested in what benefits they will derive; therefore this point should be highlighted sufficiently. The visitor to a website is interested in what is there for her. The potential benefits to the visitors should form a part of the main theme. This is an important consideration and cannot be over-emphasized.

6) Free gifts or Bonus – The audience attending the conference can be given gifts – after all they are investing there time for the presentation. The website can also offer several incentives to the visitors and lure her to visit again and again. Free ebooks, subscription to newsletters, links to related resources, articles and additional information are some of the simplest incentives that can be offered to the visitor.

7) Anticipate Questions – When a question is put up to the spokesperson, she should accept it with understanding showing that she had been expecting the question and was prepared to answer it. This approach will re-assure the audience as they develop the feeling that “everything has been taken care of”. While designing a website anticipated questions should be compiled and answers should be provided. It may be helpful to provide separate pages displaying common questions and answers.

8) Testimonials – After the end of the presentation, very few people are likely to sign-up immediately. Those who are still interested after the presentation would like to take some time to decide. They are likely to seek additional information and confirmation of the information already provided. The spokesperson should clearly spell out how easy it would be to get any further information. Visitors to the website often re-visit several times before they take any decision, particularly the decisions involving money transaction. Testimonials and endorsements appearing on the website are very effective in getting a favorable response from the visitors.

9) Follow-Up – During a presentation it is common practice to register the names and other details of the participants. This information can be used to follow-up with them by sending further messages. The website should be used to perform a very important function of capturing names and e-mail addresses of interested persons for following-up with them.

Thinking of website as a spokesperson adds a human dimension with which we are more familiar. Reviewing your website from a new angle can reveal ways of improving it.

Do You Seek Positive Conclusions to Perceived Negativity in Negotiations

Perceived negativity occurs in every negotiation, but is perceived negativity negative in a negotiation? It doesn’t have to be. Perceived negativity does occur in every negotiation. If it doesn’t, you nor the other negotiators are negotiating effectively. When perceived negativity occurs in your negotiations, how do you control it and what tactics do you employ to do so. Consider the following situations and the embedded opportunities in them.

1. If you’re outnumbered and feel disadvantaged, consider ways in which you could benefit from it. As an example, if you live in a setting where people smoke and you can’t prevent them from doing so, you might consider having cigarettes on hand and selling them at a marked up price. Grant it, the problem of preventing them from smoking would not be solved, but at least you’d profit financially from their disapproving ways. In essence, in your negotiations, when you encounter negativity, seek ways to take lemons and turn them into lemonade.

2. Hypothetically, you own the last three Picasso paintings in the world. When viewing the paintings, someone accidentally slips. While trying to catch their balance, they rip one of the paintings. One way to view this occurrence is from the perspective of having one of your paintings having lost its value. Another way to view it is from the perspective that the other two Picassos are now worth more. In your negotiations, frame negative situations to appear in their best possible light. Negativity doesn’t have to be viewed as being negative, unless that perspective serves your position. If it doesn’t serve your position, highlight the positive.

3. Negativity in a negotiation can be beneficial, but only to the degree that it’s felt. If you stress a potential negative outcome, from the perspective of how the other negotiator will be impaired if it occurs and she can’t ‘feel’ or experience that negativity, it will not be received with the same level of ‘realism’ as if it had occurred. When speaking of negativity, if you wish to highlight the potential downfall of not taking one path over another, or addressing a situation sooner versus later, cite ‘real life’ experiences that had the most horrid outcomes to heighten your point. To enrich your point, verbally paint ghoulish pictures that are as reprehensible as you can conjure.

Remember as you negotiate, your mental perception controls what is negative and that which is positive. Thus, if you control the perception of negativity during negotiations and focus on the outcome you seek, you can frame and control the flow of a negotiation. Once you become adept at doing so, you’ll begin to view perceived negativity in a new light. You may even come to appreciate and seek perceived negative situations in negotiations, because you’ll know how to use such situations to assist you in your efforts… and everything will be right with the world.

The Negotiation Tips Are…

· When negotiating, as in all phases of life, negativity begins in your mind. During negotiations, when accessing perceived negative situations, give thought to the benefits they could conceal. By doing so, you may surprise yourself by uncovering a diamond that first appeared to be coal.

· When you negotiate and you’re beset by negativity, display an even disposition. Don’t bemoan negativity to the degree that you allow it to take you ‘off your game’. As a cliché advises, ‘never let them see you sweat’.

· In a negotiation, you reach major milestones by achieving mile-pebbles. Be persistent in your attempts to achieve the goal of your negotiation and don’t be dismayed by negativity.

Creating 3D Presentations

In a typical architectural office, the method of modeling you choose often depends on the comfort level of those performing the work. You should, however, familiarize yourself with all three methods to have a variety of tools options.

There is no right or wrong way of creating 3D presentations and the last thing you want to do is to rely on only one method of modeling scenes. In the real world, you will use a combination of methods.

Think of it as buying a large set of mechanics tools. You get several cabinets (software packages), each with several drawers (menus and panels). Each drawer is filled with unusual tools (commands and modifiers). Until you familiarize yourself with as many tools as possible and have a feel for where they are and when best to use them, there is no way you can fix a car in a productive and cost-effective manner.

Even though you have the tools to model incredible detail, however, keep in mind that not all detail has to be modeled. Most 3D programs have the tools to create the illusion of 3D geometry when none exists and a productive office must know when it is appropriate to simulate complex geometry instead of modeling it.

Some 3D tools for simulating geometry are:

Bump Mapping

Opacity Mapping

Environmental Backgrounds

A couple of helpful books for anyone creating buildings and everyday household objects are the student or professional versions of Architectural Graphics Standards by Ramsey/Sleeper (John Wiley and Sons) and The Architect’s Portable Handbook by Pat Guthrie. For years the professional version of Architectural Graphics Standards has been the bible for architects and builders as a reference for the determining sizes of almost everything you can imagine from restaurant equipment, to sports field layout, to standard construction methods.