How to craft your Startup Idea?

How to Create a Successful idea for your Startup?

Search for troubles:Search for troubles around you.Small or Big, just note them and prepare a checklist of those troubles.This will be the successful start for your Startup idea.
Match your passion & interest with that checklist of troubles:It’s more of interest than the business tactics to make your venture successful.So match your passion & interest with the checklist of troubles and pick the most appropriate and needed one.
Build a practical and victorious solution:If you already have a solution for a problem then go ahead with it.Or else have e research,grab more findings and output a victorious solution.How to build such an idea?
Analyse the Product/Service : Analyse the product you are offering to the public.Be careful to make your product unique from other similar ones.This can only make your product victorious.
Is your product market demandable? : The important part is after all the developments if your product is not market demandable,then the effort will be a failure.
Are you satisfied with your invention? : The initiation will be very instant and active,but many individuals drop the idea after half way.This is due to lack of interest & passion.To avoid such a tragedy it is always better to move forward only if you are satisfied with your invention.

Evaluate how your Solution works in the industry:After building the solution or product its time to analyse how it works in the industry.How this analysis can be made?
Market Study:Market study helps you to analyse whether your product or service in the market is new and unique.
Craft a brief layout of your product.
Surf for similar products if any,compare with their features and check whether any similarities.
Monitor client suggestions to improve your output.
Audience Interaction:Audience interaction can let you know the customer response of your solution.
Check through online websites
Conduct online surveys.
Utilise social media & social circle.

Produce a MVP:MVP(Minimum Viable Product) is a basic version of your solution,to let us know whether it is market and audience demandable.MVP is different from Prototype.Prototype is just a draft of your idea whereas,MVP is the actual product used by the audience.

Winning Business Presentation Design – Creation, Formatting, Illustration Techniques Discussed

Business presentations can make or break a business proposition. Understanding key design elements and setting up your presentation can go far to assure success. There are specific items techniques that will assure a quality product. While there many other approaches, permutations, sources, and skills, these will produce a very high quality product.

The first item we want to consider is the presentation theme. Microsoft PowerPoint is probably the most readily available product. Because of this, we will focus on a presentation using this product. First, Microsoft PowerPoint offers a variety of themes as part of the package. These are not very imaginative, but in general they are conservative and will not make a bad impression. Moreover, you can tailor the color pallet, font selection, and font size on the master for each of these themes. Don’t stray too far from what is expected, but keep in mind that a good impression is the objective. Since this is the case, you probably should perform a search for free downloadable PowerPoint themes from the Internet. This will expand the possibilities, increase the impact, and improve the professional feel of your presentation.

Next, ensure the text in your presentation offers correct grammar and spelling. Nothing destroys the impact of a presentation like the immediate sense that the product is sloppily prepared.

If you are making a presentation, you are selling something. You may be selling your expertise. You may be selling the conclusions you reached from research. You may be trying to close a contract or win an investor. While you may not be a sales person, you need to expect that by definition a presentation means you are selling. Therefore, you need to decide what conclusion you expect your audience to reach. Then you need to set up your presentation to deliver that conclusion. This means that your charts need to tell them what you want them to understand, explain why this is important to them, and emotionally involves them in reaching your intended conclusion.

Now for the individual charts of your presentation. Keep your audience focused. This implies that every chart should be animated. This feature will take a few minutes to master, but choose appropriate animations that bring the audience’s focus to the charts with each main bullet. Follow the main bullets with animations bringing in subsequent bullets one at a time or in groups as the presentation objectives support. Changing it up can be valuable. A single very consistent display of items may not be the best choice. Instead use a variety of animations considering what is appropriate given the intended message and the audience.

Next, apply transitions between the slides. Transitions again help bring your audience back in focus as the motion of the change helps regain their attention.

Finally, apply graphics that support emotionally the conclusions your presentation intends.

As a presenter, these hints for visual appeal, quality appearance, solid fundamental form, and impactful display go far to assure the desired presentation result.

Mind the Three Ps For Effective Presentations – Posture, Presence and Projection

Effective presenters pay close attention to the three Ps. They make sure that their posture is erect, their presence is self-confident, and their projection is loud, but not too loud, and clear. They also use body language that enhances their message.

There are three elements that contribute to an effective presenter’s platform, or stand-up training, effectiveness. The first is posture: how you physically carry yourself. Do you stand erect, with your shoulders comfortably back and head up- or do you hunch your shoulders and shrink into yourself? Your posture has a direct impact on how your audience will perceive you (presence) and how easily they will be able to hear and understand you (projection).

The second is presence: the impression of your personality. You can appear professional, self confident, calm, and approachable. Or you can appear uncertain, anxious, distant, and humorless. It depends on your posture, your tone of voice, your willingness to smile, your comfort standing in front of people, your general or “on-stage” personality, your sense of humor, your choice of words, and your joy and/or belief in what you are doing.

The third is projection: the range and clarity of your voice. Some presenters are easy to hear and understand. Their words are loud and clear enough to distinguish their meaning. Other presenters speak softly or too rapidly, slurring syllables and making it difficult to hear and understand what they are saying.

Your posture has a great bearing on your ability to project. If you hunch over and constrict your diaphragm, it is almost impossible to get a deep breath and expel it in strong and carrying tones. However, if you stand comfortably centered and erect, and speak from your diaphragm, you will be able to bounce your voice off a far wall!

After you have taken the trouble to research and design interesting and effective learning content and activities, why would you want to unwittingly sabotage it by appearing meek and uncertain, and swallowing your words so that no one can hear them? The simplest way to check your three P’s is to have someone videotape a short presentation. Typically, people are pleasantly surprised when they play back their tape. In addition, if there is a need to polish one of the P’s, they have immediate and useful feedback.

Body language (how you look and move) can either enhance or undermine your message. Good body language will help you appear confident and knowledgeable. Poor body language will interfere with your message and your credibility.

For more effective body language communication, fight the urge to:

  • Lean into a stationary microphone (use a lavaliere microphone instead, and remember to turn it off during private moments…);
  • Stand poker straight or immobile, or do the opposite- rock or sway in place, or pace (yes, Tom Peters paced- and it made us dizzy!;
  • Use a single gesture repeatedly, or use obviously practiced gestures;
  • Chew gum or suck on candy (we really do notice!)- unless you are using a lozenge to keep from coughing, in which case, explain that to your audience;
  • Lean on or grip the lectern white-knuckled, as if holding on for dear life;
  • Look at the floor, or close your eyes;
  • Hide behind the audiovisual equipment, or turn your back to the audience;
  • Take deep sighs;
  • Play with your clothing, adjust body parts or undergarments, or lose your undergarments!
  • Shuffle your notes unnecessarily, or click your pen or laser pointer on and off;
  • Crack your knuckles, examine or bite your fingernails, clean your ears, or perform any other body care activity!
  • Cross your arms in front of your chest;
  • Twirl or pat your hair, or play with your jewelry (that includes you, too, guys!);
  • Jangle change or keys in your pockets; or
  • Whisper, whimper, mumble, or shout.

The next time you give a presentation, pay attention to your posture, your presence and your projection. Remember that your body language will either enhance or undermine your message, so stay poised and in control.