Organic Skin Care Products: Which To Use?

If you eat organic food and sleep on organic sheets, it makes sense that you might also add organic skin care products to the mix.

To some, this is news. The idea that you can put organic skin care products on your face might be a very new idea, but those involved with beauty products know what others are just finding out – organic skin care products can give your skin a level of care that traditional products can’t.

What makes a product organic?

As with any food product you might buy that’s labeled organic, any skin care product that is called organic must meet certain standards. Specifically, every ingredient in the product must be produced organically. Because some factory-made ingredients are far from organic, this also means that organic products are usually more natural and healthy for the skin than non-organic products.

Organic beauty products are ideal for sensitive skin and those with skin allergies. Sometimes they are much more effective than traditional products as well.

What products can be found in organic forms?

There are many products on the market today that are organic. They might not be as easy to find as non-organic products, but as more and more people seek out organics for food and other things, they will also begin to seek out more organic skin care and beauty products and that will make them easier to find over time.

Some of the best selling organic skin care products available today are Athena products.

The Athena 7 Minute Lift is a high quality product that has gotten rave reviews in recent months for its ability to provide visible benefit to the skin within 7 minutes. Those who use the product say that within those 7 minutes they notice that their skin is more lifted, firmer and looks suppler.

But the benefits go beyond the 7 minutes. Due to a unique and proprietary blend of organic ingredients, the cream can also help your skin age better over the long term, which gives you a one-two punch of immediate and future benefit.

Other Athena skin care products are getting attention these days, such as their stem cell serums thanks to the success of the 7 Minute Lift. Many of these products are also organic and provide benefit to the skin through the use of quality ingredients that are also completely naturally produced.

Other brands of organic skin care include Miessence which are not known for instant lift or anti wrinkle creams, but more for their organic cleansers which can accompany the use of a good organic wrinkle cream.

How can you find organic products?

In the past, you had to order from a specialty catalog in order to get organic skin care products, but these days the process is much simpler. You can order online (even sometimes including a sample you can try before you buy the entire jar or bottle of something) and you can find some of the products in health food stores.

Your best bet is to find an online store that sells these products. Order the sample and try the product out. If it works, you can then order the entire product. This will save you the investment if the product isn’t going to work.

Organic products are new and popular in skin care these days. Seek out some of these products and see what they can do for your skin.

Do You Seek Positive Conclusions to Perceived Negativity in Negotiations

Perceived negativity occurs in every negotiation, but is perceived negativity negative in a negotiation? It doesn’t have to be. Perceived negativity does occur in every negotiation. If it doesn’t, you nor the other negotiators are negotiating effectively. When perceived negativity occurs in your negotiations, how do you control it and what tactics do you employ to do so. Consider the following situations and the embedded opportunities in them.

1. If you’re outnumbered and feel disadvantaged, consider ways in which you could benefit from it. As an example, if you live in a setting where people smoke and you can’t prevent them from doing so, you might consider having cigarettes on hand and selling them at a marked up price. Grant it, the problem of preventing them from smoking would not be solved, but at least you’d profit financially from their disapproving ways. In essence, in your negotiations, when you encounter negativity, seek ways to take lemons and turn them into lemonade.

2. Hypothetically, you own the last three Picasso paintings in the world. When viewing the paintings, someone accidentally slips. While trying to catch their balance, they rip one of the paintings. One way to view this occurrence is from the perspective of having one of your paintings having lost its value. Another way to view it is from the perspective that the other two Picassos are now worth more. In your negotiations, frame negative situations to appear in their best possible light. Negativity doesn’t have to be viewed as being negative, unless that perspective serves your position. If it doesn’t serve your position, highlight the positive.

3. Negativity in a negotiation can be beneficial, but only to the degree that it’s felt. If you stress a potential negative outcome, from the perspective of how the other negotiator will be impaired if it occurs and she can’t ‘feel’ or experience that negativity, it will not be received with the same level of ‘realism’ as if it had occurred. When speaking of negativity, if you wish to highlight the potential downfall of not taking one path over another, or addressing a situation sooner versus later, cite ‘real life’ experiences that had the most horrid outcomes to heighten your point. To enrich your point, verbally paint ghoulish pictures that are as reprehensible as you can conjure.

Remember as you negotiate, your mental perception controls what is negative and that which is positive. Thus, if you control the perception of negativity during negotiations and focus on the outcome you seek, you can frame and control the flow of a negotiation. Once you become adept at doing so, you’ll begin to view perceived negativity in a new light. You may even come to appreciate and seek perceived negative situations in negotiations, because you’ll know how to use such situations to assist you in your efforts… and everything will be right with the world.

The Negotiation Tips Are…

· When negotiating, as in all phases of life, negativity begins in your mind. During negotiations, when accessing perceived negative situations, give thought to the benefits they could conceal. By doing so, you may surprise yourself by uncovering a diamond that first appeared to be coal.

· When you negotiate and you’re beset by negativity, display an even disposition. Don’t bemoan negativity to the degree that you allow it to take you ‘off your game’. As a cliché advises, ‘never let them see you sweat’.

· In a negotiation, you reach major milestones by achieving mile-pebbles. Be persistent in your attempts to achieve the goal of your negotiation and don’t be dismayed by negativity.

Mind the Three Ps For Effective Presentations – Posture, Presence and Projection

Effective presenters pay close attention to the three Ps. They make sure that their posture is erect, their presence is self-confident, and their projection is loud, but not too loud, and clear. They also use body language that enhances their message.

There are three elements that contribute to an effective presenter’s platform, or stand-up training, effectiveness. The first is posture: how you physically carry yourself. Do you stand erect, with your shoulders comfortably back and head up- or do you hunch your shoulders and shrink into yourself? Your posture has a direct impact on how your audience will perceive you (presence) and how easily they will be able to hear and understand you (projection).

The second is presence: the impression of your personality. You can appear professional, self confident, calm, and approachable. Or you can appear uncertain, anxious, distant, and humorless. It depends on your posture, your tone of voice, your willingness to smile, your comfort standing in front of people, your general or “on-stage” personality, your sense of humor, your choice of words, and your joy and/or belief in what you are doing.

The third is projection: the range and clarity of your voice. Some presenters are easy to hear and understand. Their words are loud and clear enough to distinguish their meaning. Other presenters speak softly or too rapidly, slurring syllables and making it difficult to hear and understand what they are saying.

Your posture has a great bearing on your ability to project. If you hunch over and constrict your diaphragm, it is almost impossible to get a deep breath and expel it in strong and carrying tones. However, if you stand comfortably centered and erect, and speak from your diaphragm, you will be able to bounce your voice off a far wall!

After you have taken the trouble to research and design interesting and effective learning content and activities, why would you want to unwittingly sabotage it by appearing meek and uncertain, and swallowing your words so that no one can hear them? The simplest way to check your three P’s is to have someone videotape a short presentation. Typically, people are pleasantly surprised when they play back their tape. In addition, if there is a need to polish one of the P’s, they have immediate and useful feedback.

Body language (how you look and move) can either enhance or undermine your message. Good body language will help you appear confident and knowledgeable. Poor body language will interfere with your message and your credibility.

For more effective body language communication, fight the urge to:

  • Lean into a stationary microphone (use a lavaliere microphone instead, and remember to turn it off during private moments…);
  • Stand poker straight or immobile, or do the opposite- rock or sway in place, or pace (yes, Tom Peters paced- and it made us dizzy!;
  • Use a single gesture repeatedly, or use obviously practiced gestures;
  • Chew gum or suck on candy (we really do notice!)- unless you are using a lozenge to keep from coughing, in which case, explain that to your audience;
  • Lean on or grip the lectern white-knuckled, as if holding on for dear life;
  • Look at the floor, or close your eyes;
  • Hide behind the audiovisual equipment, or turn your back to the audience;
  • Take deep sighs;
  • Play with your clothing, adjust body parts or undergarments, or lose your undergarments!
  • Shuffle your notes unnecessarily, or click your pen or laser pointer on and off;
  • Crack your knuckles, examine or bite your fingernails, clean your ears, or perform any other body care activity!
  • Cross your arms in front of your chest;
  • Twirl or pat your hair, or play with your jewelry (that includes you, too, guys!);
  • Jangle change or keys in your pockets; or
  • Whisper, whimper, mumble, or shout.

The next time you give a presentation, pay attention to your posture, your presence and your projection. Remember that your body language will either enhance or undermine your message, so stay poised and in control.